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Auschwitz: 

The Underground 

Guided Tour 



What the Tour Guides 
Don't Tell You at 
Auschwitz- Birkenau 




" I . . ■ 






B* - 



f R ! ■ 

Bv Carolyn l'LAunn 
PfeniffiuAn at 'hit ft\nv<h tHi-LLh 



Auschwitz: 
The Underground 
Guided Tour 

WliarlheTtmi Guides DotlVfell Ymi ill Auschwitz M\\ 'trenail 

Ynu (K>ld in your hands a rcJuarkable Hlurty of Auschwitz 
that Ls unlike anything y*< published, llmitjih if is purposely 
small in fri/i L .inrf easy Eo read , i t ca ltkk a pOfvf rlill punch. The 
author visited Auschwitz Mi lolirlsl aimed wilh a broad sludy 
of the I i(i. L r.mir r snrrtHi iiding, the world- famous si Le, .1 ml I'm III 
ih.il vtsil h.is proceeded to decuiHlmt't the Auschwitz shown 
tohcrand others jsa 'death" or M e« termination" camp. ISy Uk- 
ing Ihe reader on an ~unncr|>rauri(l ^I'iili'il inm" around 
Auschwitz- IliriciiHUi , silt fie ariy demonstrates it to he, at vai-y- 
Ing Units *nd local Ions within the pcTuncterVi ,| simple labor, 
concentration and t nm nil CI HI p [w pnlil tral n-rismicra r where 
the" Ik-aJlh i i-l Lhe inmates was the prime concent Millie camp 
dirthorirlu. Sound unbeli^^lHp? After reading this carefully 
researched book, you will seo. the horror stories for 90 Jong 
spread about Anscnw itz-JH rtteuau in .■ urvllglit b and you may 
rarywcil be^o Emc»rC#*ed you'll want lu share your new vision 
wiih tHln-i-M. This raul kmsly written work nUH'fS toward a sur- 
prising conclusion llml (eaves uu pondering how so much thai 
is nOl trite IliTS seeped into our consciousness as ^Tart* 

Auh hwitt: The (.IndtryrvMHt GatM 'four ■, sairrover n 4H 
1 1 ages . #££, (1 1.1 1 ts available from I'UK, P.O. Bo* 15*77, Wasli ing- 
n>iL. D,C joooj. Call loll free al 1 -877-773-2077 to charge copies 
la Visa ur MC No SAM iii5,kie U.S. BUUt UiSCDUNTSh l-g 
tuples are 110 earLu6-4<j copies are iy^Khi 50 -fjfl copies are su 
each; idooT more art reduced Lnpusts^oach. 




MjiiLir.iciiiiLnl In America 
hy IHL HrtKNILS KfcVlLW 
I'.tJ (V-., ■!?■;- 
Washington] Rt: r ihicmij 

1 ' "77 _ 773 _ *' lJ 77 •o" h" ee 
w~ww.llanii7sRpvirWnOr|[ 



Table of Contents 



Auschwitz: The Underground Guided Tour 



In L rod net ion ,,...,.. ,,,,..■►:, .„.-,,,, , . . 5 

A Little History You Don'i Get from the Ion r Guides , , , 7 

The Unofficial 'four , ,,_„,,,.,„_, 13 

The Gimp Lay Out ,.,,-.. . , ; . ..44 

Brothel & Library .,._._.,., 15 

Art Museum , , , . , 16 

Kitchen ...,,,,, , , ...,., 18' 

The Camp-Orchestra , ,J$j 

A hffstory e*F the Orchestra , . . 20 

The Women's Orchestra at Birkenau ..,..,.,, 21 

Other Music and Theater Graups , , , .21 

The Auschwitz Pnst Office „ , . , , . 23 

Infirmaries , . , xS 

The Theater , . 27 

the Swimming Fool , 29 

The Hospital , , , 32 

The Crematorium , , , .„,„ .34 

The Workshops ...,,.,-.,._ „ : . ... 36 

Recreational SpQrts 1 1 ■ . .,..,., 37 

The Birken.au Concentration Camp , , , , ,....,..,..,.. 38 

The Central Sauna ,. i: . , $5 

Diagram of Birkenau Camp t _ . 40 

The Kitchens , ^ 

IVIirsii ^. M.nting .;:■. 

Sports & Soccer Field ...... ,43 

Crematorium;; , , 43 

Liberation as Propaganda 45 

Ausch-wifz-Bivkenait Memorial 46 




Introduction 



1 HE STORY you are told by tour guides at Auschwitz-Birkenau is 
a. story woven through, with exaggeration, distortion and omission. These 
lies and omissions are not due to ignorance or misunderstanding, lack 
of information or- the confusion of war, but intentional. 

This booklet is too small to tell the whole story — it is an introduction 
only, to a massive fraud that continues today at the Auschwitz- Bii'kenau 
Memorial and Museum in Poland, By the early 1990s, hal fa million peo- 
ple were visiting every year. It is now over a million. These millions have 
been told some things but not told other things. They are also shown 
some tilings, but not shown other things. They have no way of determin- 
ing the truth of what they see and hear. They generally enter the premises 
in a state of firm helief in "the holocaust and leave convinced that what 
they believed is correct— and even worse than they thought. 






■ 




INDOCTRINATION 
STARTS EARLY* . . . 

Young children study 
an exhibit at the 
Auschwitz. Museum 
with their guide. 

PHUTOi MMA*WES5TTE 



However, the true story of Ausch- 
witz-Birkenau is not in any way un- 
usual considering its wartime setLing. 
Sq brace yourself for an eye-opening 
tour of the real Auschwitz- Birkenau. 
Of the three tamps that made up die 
entirety that operated from 1940-1945, 
only Auschwitz remains intact today, although with 
some reconstructions and "sa the center of booming 
Auschwitz tourism. Birkenau has few remaining build- 
ings, and Monowitz is completely gone. 

— DhROlYN YMCER 
February 20 in 




THE AUSCHWITZ MAIN CAMP 

Bfrd'j-eye view/ of the Ausdnvwti main cam p. snowing the former administration au.lding (today 
the -visitor tenter with parking lo-c} at lower right. Upper right, outside the fan.ee, is die theater 
buildhg,The road leading into the camp (Arbeit Mack Frei Gate) h at lower center and runs 
along the large kitchen complex to its right. The hospital arid crematorium are cue off at the 
lower left oi the di dure. The camp commitr dint's residence is at die far left, center. 



A Little History 

You Don't Get 

from the 

Tour Guides 



1 HE TOWN of Auschwitz was founded in 1170 
by Germans — therefore 'Auschwitz" is its original 
name, not Oswiccim, which is its Polish translation. 
Auschwitz was in the Germanic- ruled Holy Roman 
Empire until 1457, when it became put of the Kingdom 
of Poland, When Poland lost its independence hi 1772, 
Auschwitz came under Austrian rule and became a 
prime location for Jewish traders working between 
Russia, Prussia and Austri a, In the wake of WW E, Gali- 
cia (which included Auschwitz) was given to the newly 
formed Republic of Poland. In 1939, it was annexed 
back into the Greater Germ an Reich. At that time, of a 
population of 12,000, over half were Jewish, The nest 
laj-gest group was toma (gypsies). 




Gypsies made up (he 
second largest popula- 
tion group living in the 
town of Auschwitz. 
A Gypsy Family 'Camp 
occupied a MCtlort of 
Birkenau beginning 
in I M I. 



6 



AUSCHWITZ. THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



AUSCHWITZ. T HE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



RAILROAD HUB 

Rail expansion turned 
tiny Ausch w\a inw the 

Junction of Europe— 
and a perfect location 
for 3 main camp, where 
prisoners were sorted 
and disinfected before 
transfer to smaller 
labor cam pi ih rough - 
em Grossdeutsthlaftd. 



Because it was one of the largest Tail road junctions 
in Europe (44 train lilies came into it), a camp for mi- 
grant workers was buiit by the Austrians in n)i6, Farm 
workers from all over Europe stayed in the welL-built, 
red-brick barracks. En 1919, the Poles used them as an 
array garrison. Of the 20 barracks at that time, 14 were 
single story, When the Germans took over after 1939, 
they added second stories and built eight new match- 
ing two -story barracks, 






■-l|.T^^ 



flail roads Leading 
to Auschwitz 




KONZENTRATiGNSLAGT-R AUSCHWITZ 

Reichsftiehrer-SS Heinrich Himmler announced the 

plan to establish a POW Lamp at Auschwitz on April 
27, 1940, German criminals from the Sachsenhausen 
concentration camp were used to convert the garrison 
inra a prisoner- of- war camp, and it opened on June 14, 
1940 with the arrival of 728 prisoners of the Polish re- 
sistance transferred from Tarnow. Rudolf Ho<?ss was 
named the first commandant of the camp. 







In 1942, after the construction of Bitkenau had got- 
ten under way, a camp classification system was devised 
and Auschwitz was designated a Class 1 camp (similar 
to Dachau).' this was Lhe highest class, where common 
criminals and political agitators had a good chance for 
release, The aim was reform, re-education and fehaMl- 
jtalioa forme r Auschwitz Museum Director Fran- 
ciszek Piper wrote that 1,500 prisoners were released 
from Auschwitz, but that doesn't include those who 
were transferred elsewhere and then released. The 
Arbeit Mncht Fie; slogan mi the gate was only used at 
Class 1 camps, where labor did indeed bring freedom; 
It was not a cruel irony, 



HiMMLER 

AND 

HOESS 

fteibsfuEhrer He:nnch 
HSttmlsr (reft) with the 
ft'Sl Auschwitz Canmsn- 
dint Rudok Hoess, 






AUSCHWITZ: "HE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR. 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



^»" 




GATES OF DEATH? 

Does this look fke a 

prison dear or the 

gate ta a death camp? 



Auschwitz functioned as a labor and a transit camp, 
meaning it was also used as an intermediate destina- 
tion for prisoners being sent elsewhere. Inmates 
worked in nearby factories like I.C, farben or on infra- 
structui-e projects, such as buiidingairraid bunkers and 
cutting trees. The camp had professional carpenters, 
electricians,- bookmakers, tailors; Miniates learned 
Lhese trades there, ivith 20 to 30 men supervised by a 
kapo (another prisoner). Fort)' inmates worked in the 
kitchen, The workdays had been forma I ined in ygffi. 
On weekdays, work hours were 7:30-0:00 noon and 
12:30-5:00. Saturdays; 7r;r>-iz:oa, Saturday afternoon 
and al I day Sunday were free. Inmates were encouraged 
to attend Christian religious services and to reflect on 
the reasons For their imprisonment. 

People in the town of Auschwitz reported that dur- 
ing the war it was possible to take tours of the camp on 



special days. For some, life in Auschwitz seemed luxu- 
rious compared to their own, strange as that sounds. 
The attractive red -brick sleeping quarter's contained 
bunk beds with mattresses, had Hush toilets, porcelain- 
covered stoves for cozy heating, and double-paned 
easement windows. Tree-lined pathways and flowers 
pia nled in front of every barracks in the summer made 
lor a pleasant atmosphere. 

At that time, ordinary people didn't have what we 
take for granted today. !n Eastern Europe the poor lived 
without electricity indoor plumbing and central heat- 
ing. Food was not plentiful orvariedi nor was clothing; 
and they were often at the mercy oi political factions. 
People labored from dawn to dusk, six days a week. 




OPEN-AIR FACILITY 

Workmen clear ih<? Surest in front of sevEral of rhe buildings at Auschwitz in 
preparation of the 60th aftnivBtKir)' of the camp's I ibe ration i" 1 945. 



AUSCHWITZ: THE U N O E R G RO U N D GUIDED TOUR 



AU5CHWI-Z: THE U N D E F. G R.O U N-D GUIDED TO UK 



II 



PHO'p- SawflUUr.R^ei.CCM 




7 



TYPICAL BARRACKS IN AUSCHWITZ I 

The average nvostery (third tioif under the roof) barracks 
were well-maintained and had plenty of windows. Paved 
roads ran hetween die thr'-ee tree-shaded rows of 
IB blocks from the beginning. 



WHO WAS DITLIEB FELDEftERJ 

Ditfceb Felderer.a Swede who was fluent in Danish. Norwegian, Germa.i, 
French and English, personally investigated all of the existing German 
concentration camps in the 1970s. He questioned museum personnel 
from directors to guards; interviewed Iota! people is well as survivors; 
read the official holocaust 'Iteratu re: searched the gi'ounds itfld went 
into every building he could, takinp -ah olographic slides as a record. He 
published a book, Auschwitz Exit. He testified for four days at the Ernst 
Zundel trial ir 1938 in Canada, during which 300 of the 30;000 siides. 
he took in the camps ware shown co tile [try. Zundel was acquitted. 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUiDED TO.Uft 






The Unofficial Tour 



Using John Ball's accurate diagram, which 

shews the cam p from t he opposi to d tcaec 1 on as t he a e ri a I 
photograph Of! page 6, the MttpGffani facilities tan be 
located. The tour starts at the administration building, 
now the visitors center. When the camp was in opera- 
tion, this building housed 19 debusing eh a rubers that 
used Zyklon-fl, The theater where visitors watch flte 
propaganda film to get them in the right an ti -German 
flame of mind was used back then to show films and 
German- made movies to the in mites. Ditlieb tender- 
er (see boxed item on facing page) states that Museum 
Historian Frantisi'.ck Piper told him thattht' seats in the 
cinema were identical to those used by the inmates. 

After walking through the gate, the official tour 
takes you to several barracks that make up the actual 
museum, where the approved history of Auschwiu- 
Birkenau is told by enlarged photographs with text, 
drawings and items in glass case*. Every guide concen- 
t rates 011 Lbeir favorite exhibits about wliich they have 
memorized some stories: they do not necessarily agree 
or say the same things. 

On my tour in 2009, our guide mentiuned thaL a 
large photo of liberated children was "four months 
after liberation," When I asked why they were still 
wearing the striped uniforms, she admitted the pho- 
tos were from propaganda films made later by the So- 
viets— a recnactm en t byadultsand children dressed 
in the old uniforms. If I hadn't asked, it would not 
have been told. 



AUSCHWITZ THE U N D E R.G ROUND GUIDED TOUR 




Over 600 children 
were at Birkemu 
when the Russians 
arrived, But ace these 
the -children .. ,or 
local lads dressed up 
months later? No 
films were made 
during the liberation 
in January IMS. 



S i\ a I £ 

molars 

« 2i 5P 




* .is 

* • 






• • » 



2Z, 



.21 - 



THE CAMP LAY OUT AT AUSCHWITZ 

(I) irees; (2) administration bidding,; (J) rail spur; (4) one of 
nine guard towers; (S) parallel mra fences {6) Ai'beit Mseh Frei 
Gata,(7) hospital with surgical unlt;(B) crematorium; (9) work- 
shops for woodworking arid sewing; (10) brothel arid library: 
(I !) place wlwre tha orchestra played; (12.) kitchen with 13 
roal-fired Moves; ( 1 3 ) p ML office ; ( 1 4) th nee -stor/ sleepxig bar- 
racks; ( I S) theater for music arid drama; f I &} jand and gravel pit; 
(17) swimming pooJ; (IS) Birch Alley (Birken^aller); (t9) camp 
idrrnisrracou offices: (20) camp commandant's residence; 
(H) Sola River road leading to town of Auschwitz (2 km); 
(22) cement fence around two sides of damp, 



T 






BROTHELS. LIBRARY 

Just inside [he main gate of Auschwitz is Block 14, 
a lar^e building used asafooibsl for the inn-Mies. ]i was 
not a secret that the camp hid a brothel; it was men- 
tioned in books and itse.xisten.ee was.canfirmcd by the 
Auschwitz .Museum officials. It was staffed by mostly 
Polish women from the outside who worked there by 
choice, but German prostitutes are said to have also 
worked there. All prisoners were notaJ lowed to use the 
brothel; they had to meet certain hygienic and other 
standards. It was also used as a reward far good behav- 
ior or extra e (tort. 

On the first floor of the brothel was the camp li- 
brary according to former inmates. All main camps had 
libraries, and as a Class 1 camp Austhwi tz certainly Lad 
ope, but the museum Is mum about it. Fhereis no sign 
iden ti Fying the buil di ng as once a brothe 1 or li bra ry, and 
yon cannot enter it— it's now the office of" the museum 
director and houses the archives. 



Block 24 housed a 
brorhel, a library, or- 
chestra practice 'and 
concert Kail In the 
basement, and liter 
added air art museum, 




(4 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



IS 




Typical irtwork 
created by prisoners 
In Anschwkjt art 
classes. 



THE ART MUSEUM 

Block 24 ill so held the camp art museum. The idea 
came koto Polish inmate and artist t'r.iiieis-zekTargosz, 
whose accomplished sketches imp^ssed GaHKnaadant 
Hoess. He named Targos/. head of the museum, 
founded in October 194 1. with its first home in Lid tracks 
6. ft was moved to Barracks 24 in March 1942, where it 
occupied two rooms until la te Ja si uaiy 1945. Art mate- 
rials were supplied by the camp administration, and 
classes took place. Ait of all kinds, including sculpture, 
was produced and exhibited for the enjoyment of the 
entire camp. Targosz survived until 1979, 

During my tour in 2009, we were shown a room in 
one of the museum huildingsdcYoted to "prisoner art- 
work." it consisted of drawings depicting extreme bru- 
tality carried out on helpless prisoners by SS guards; 
incredihle flights of fantasy created by survivors from 
mem ory, after the war was over. Perhaps w i tb a I itl I e e n - 
courage men t? Examples of this type can be found in 
Zona Rozensirauch's Death Camp Auschwitz album and 
Yehuda Bacon's crude sketches that are dated ''about 
1945" and exhibited at Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial 



Museum in Israel. This sketch by Bacon was actually 
submitted as confirmation of gas chambers in 
Auschwitz at the Adolf Eichmann trial in Jerusalem, 
1961, and the Auschwitz trial in Frankfurt. 1964! 



Authentic prisoner artwork, which you won't find 
in the museum room J was in, boles like this: 



Le^t. Francisick 
Jszwiecki, Fortrai! 
of i'ta'iTi-Jaw Lerfs r. 
nWfm. J 943, 
Aiischnvitl- 
Birkerau State 
Museum, 

Righi, Miecspstaw 
Kosedniak, A! 
the Ease*. 1-94-1, 
Auschwitz- 
Birkenau Siaic 
Museum; 




Yehuda Baton, Gas 
Cumber, I piSi%ii 

VashertiArt Museum, 
jerusalsrn 





U 



A.USCHWITZ: THE UNDiRGROUND OUIDED TOUR 



AUSCHW TZrTHE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



r7 



more-. scfcAreooKFwSES.nwi 



Below; View of the 

back of itie kitchsn 

just Fr>Ejde the gate at 

the main camp of 

Auschwitz, I94S. 

[Photo: USH MM 

Photo Archive's) 



They are pott casts, still lifes, landscapesand carka- 
tuiesj typical of artists everywhere, The State Museum 
Auschwitz- ttirkenau in Lhe town of Oswiecim owns 
some 1470 piecesand exhibits them, yetonlya very fbw 
depict, violence: or cruelty, 

THE KITCHEN 

Across the entry road finm the broth el /library 
was the kitchen— the largest building in the camp. It 
had 12 chimneys for the stoves, and included a dietary 
section, a bakery and butchery. Forty inmates worked 
in the kitchen, Special diets were prepared for pa- 
tients in lhe infirmary and hospital. The kitchen had 
flush toilets, which were unknown to the first Soviet 
soldiers -to arrive, who thought Lhey were places to 
wash their hands! 










M 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 




The front of the kitchen is not identified for visitors; 
attention is directed at this spot to the 03d Sentry Box 
and the gallows (used only once). There are plans un- 
derfoot to convert the kitchen into an an museum, 
which will further destroy awareness of the careful 
feeding of the prisoners. My tour guide only pointed 
out where the orchestra played alongside the kitchen, 
by the entry road, but said nothing about the kitchen it- 
self. She took.every oppoitunityto toll US that prisoner;, 
were starved to deaLlv as an other way of killing them. 

THE CAMP ORCHESTRAS 

Many musical groups were formed by the inmates 
over the life of the camp. Today the signs and guides 
tell us the only purpose of "the orchestra" was to keep 
the prisoners orderly when marching out to and hack 
from work. They don't want visitors to know the camp 
had a flourishing cultural life. In truth, the orchestras 
gave regular Sunday concerts and played on many other 
occasions. 



AUSCHWITZ. THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



The unidentified 
kite lien from the 
fnjnnthe two match- 
ing brick buildings are 
in front of the long 

building seen from the 
rear on the feeing 

page, forming a 
courtyard. 



19 




Sunday afternoon toh- 
cert probably in 1943, 
but certainly after 
September l942.The 
conductor is die Pol- 
ish inmato Frssnz 
N'ierychlo. 



H F STORY OF THE ORCH ESTRA 

The first prisoner orchestra was set Ltp in the w inter 
of'194], with Franz Nierycli In as conductor. The origi- 
nal yruupoi' seven musicians, paying first with instru- 
ments From neighboring towns, included a violin, 
contrabass, accordion, trumpet, saxophone and per- 
aissicm. These were later replaced with better quality 
instruments, some sent to the .musicians by family 
member. Their first formal rehearsal was held in Block 
24, the basement under the camp brothel, where there 
was a small podium and a grand piano. This room be- 
came known as the concert hall, where the band gare 
shows for prisoners as ivel I as guards and officials. The 
audience would stand along the walls; the musicians 
were scattered throughout the room, sitting wherever 
they could find a space. The group rapidly expanded to 



10 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND G U * D E P TOUR 



more than ioo members, 

Survivor accounts such as Fania Fenelon's Pioyiin] 
for Time also spoke of the Auschwitz orchestra. A large 
blow-up of a photograph of the orchestra playing dur- 
ing the war was once displayed at the Auschwitz Mu- 
seum at the main entrance. 



Anodi'er view of the 
lame cone ere Mote 
Crist Inmates are gath- 
ering around, not 
march frij> to work, 




WOMEN'S ORCHESTRA AT I3JRKENAU 

From the beginning of 1043 until the end of 1944, 
there existed a Women's Orchestra in Birkenau. The 
conductor was violinist Alma Rose, the niece of Gustav 
Mahler. The orchestra soon became a permanent insti- 
tution of the social life in the camp, With over 50 mu- 
sicians and a variety of instruments, they played 
classical mixed with lighter fare on arrival of new pris- 
oners, in the infirmary and the experimental station; 



AUSCH WITZ: THE u N D E ft G K.O U N □ G U I D E D TOUR 



II 



Fan-jtYwIuji 
I>J! MiifchcODtLhahi: 

J LI Ail*. I II .■/ 




Member of the French 
resistance fania Gold- 
stein, *vm deported to 
Birfcaoau where she 
became a member of 
die Women'* Orches- 
tra. After the war, she 
wok the career name 
Fenjslofi, became a 
we! I- known cabaret 
singer ard wrote her 
msmoir andkhls novel. 



iit concerts which the S§ attended and at Christmas 
parties and dances f there was a tege room in the 
"sauna" at Birkenau that was sometimes used as a ball- 
room), The novel Don Madchenordwster von Ausch- 
witz, written by in em ber Fania Fen el on arid first 
published in 1976, was based on the existence of the 
Women's Orchestra. Every member or' the orchestra 
survived the war except for Alma Ruse, who succumbed 
to typhus. 

OTHER MUSIC fit THEATER GROUPS 

Violinist Szymcm Laks was conductor of the Bfrke- 
nan Men's Camp Orchestra in 1944, The performances 
took place in various places around the camp. Birkenau 
aJso had a brass band and a camp choir, From an article 
in the Jerusalem Post, January 25, 1995: 

[This I Jewish children''! choir at Ausdiivfa-Birke- 
nau: Iiras a member of that choir, ..,],,. remember 
my first engagement with culture, with history, and 
with music— in the camp.. . , In March 1944, twas se- 
verely ill with diphtheria and was sent 10 the camp 
hospital barracks, My mother had asted in be trans- 
ferred to stay with me in the hospital Nurses, doc- 
tors and pads nts survived, , , . 

One of tire youth leaders of our group . , . asked 
to establish an education center for children. He was 
given permission, and in a short time the education 
center became a spiritual and social center (or the 
Family camp, It was the soul of the ramp. 

Musical and theatrical performances, including 
a child re rt's opera, v. eve held at the center There were 
discussionE/of various ideologies— Zionism, Social- 
ism, Czech nationalism. , , , There was a conductor 
named hnte . , . who organised the children's choir. 
Rehearsal; here held in a huge lavatory barracks. 



AUSCHWITZ THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED "OUR 



pJ ^°*P«^ CoH 










THE AUSCHWITZ, POST OFFICE 

As you walk past the front of the kitchen, the first 
building to the right was the post office. Nothing in the 

museum literature mentions the post office, the guides 
don't speak of it, but the Geneva Convention rife 
stricLly followed by the Germans, ensured the sefldhjg 
and receiving of mail by ail prisoners. The camps en- 
couraged inmates to write to their relatives by malting 
smkW prc-printed cards and letter forms, This was 
checked by the Red Cross, who never found any viola- 
tion of this privilege alAuschwitz-Birkenau. 

Regulations printed on die address side ate clearly 
stared ■ They translate as: 

Every prisoner is allowed to receive (and send! 
two letters or cards from (to) his relatives each 
month, The letters to prisoners must be easily read- 
able, be written in. ink, and consist of 11 a more Uwi 



AUSCHWITZ. THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUft 



The one-story post 
office is the buitding 
with the different 
shnped roof, just pa^t 
(fee Oid Semry Bos 
and one-story kitchen 
building, Tha whole 
idea of an AuscWti 
post office for Inmates- 
is anathema to 
nri-js?um officials, 
because it doesn't 
(lithe talediey are 
seUng, It had V> 
therefore fm 
discarded. 



i3 









., 1,-jj Dft; 



i 



I 



--1 



RUDOLF HOESS 










■ 

: : ;■ - ■ 



i 

. 



I 






14 



15 lines on a single sheet. Only letter sheers? of the 
norma! size are allowed. Envelopes fftUSl be u ill u led, 
Only 5 5ta1v.ps nf 12 Pf each may be enclosed wirh 
each letter. Nci other enclosures are permitted, and 
will Ik confiscated. Postcards consist of 10 lines. Pho- 
tographs may not be used as postcards. 

Money may be sent. Newspapers are allowed but 
only if ordered through tile Atisdi'-vitz camp post of- 
fice. Parcels may nut be sent, as the prisoners can buy 
everything on camp. ijlowe\er, in the letter, the pris- 
oner thanks hisfamiiyfar all their packages aflrf asks 
fat more. From much other evidence., it $&tftt$ this 
particular regulation was net enforced. Thk alio 
proves there rase vomp store jar in mates, where they 
(Quid buy things with monc)' sent front home— same- 
thing eke that k never mentioned in the museum lit- 
erature or by the tpiides,} 

Requests to camp authorities for release are 
pointless. Visits to prisoners are no; permissible. 

Signed, the Cam]: Commandant 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR. 











On the inside of the form is the tetter from the pris- 
oner. Notice that it reads : 'Pust Office M" —indicating 
there was more than one post office at Auschwitz: 

Addressed to; Josef Novy, Bakery 

Dot™ v\i ce 1 P rotec trsrate of Bohemia and Moravi a 

From: josef Nov y 

Date of Binh: 17th April 1911 

Pn.soner Number: 73,034. Block 9a, 

Con cent ratio 11 Camp Auschwitz, Post Office TJ 

Auschwitz. 14II1 February 194.3 

My dear ones! 

I'm in good health, and I'm all right— I hope the 
same applies to you, I've received three letters and six 
parcels from you recently— all in good shape. Letters 
and parcels may not be sent registered, just send the 
parcels : a» per the first ones. The first parcels made 
me very happy— part 'tea lady the chocolate, honey 
and the many svceels— please send more like that 
My brother Jarde and aunt Milka could also send me 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOU..B 



Letter forms given CO 
prisoners provided 
space foj r longer, more 
private Ties; ages than 
postal cards. There is 
no reason to believe 
that lorrnsl letters W 
and from famrSes werd 
ever discouraged by 
camp authorities'. 



is 



more-. scfcAreooKFwSES.nwi 



Below; View of the 

back of itie kitchsn 

just Fr>Ejde the gate at 

the main camp of 

Auschwitz, I94S. 

[Photo: USH MM 

Photo Archive's) 



They are pott casts, still lifes, landscapesand carka- 
tuiesj typical of artists everywhere, The State Museum 
Auschwitz- ttirkenau in Lhe town of Oswiecim owns 
some 1470 piecesand exhibits them, yetonlya very fbw 
depict, violence: or cruelty, 

THE KITCHEN 

Across the entry road finm the broth el /library 
was the kitchen— the largest building in the camp. It 
had 12 chimneys for the stoves, and included a dietary 
section, a bakery and butchery. Forty inmates worked 
in the kitchen, Special diets were prepared for pa- 
tients in lhe infirmary and hospital. The kitchen had 
flush toilets, which were unknown to the first Soviet 
soldiers -to arrive, who thought Lhey were places to 
wash their hands! 










M 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 




The front of the kitchen is not identified for visitors; 
attention is directed at this spot to the 03d Sentry Box 
and the gallows (used only once). There are plans un- 
derfoot to convert the kitchen into an an museum, 
which will further destroy awareness of the careful 
feeding of the prisoners. My tour guide only pointed 
out where the orchestra played alongside the kitchen, 
by the entry road, but said nothing about the kitchen it- 
self. She took.every oppoitunityto toll US that prisoner;, 
were starved to deaLlv as an other way of killing them. 

THE CAMP ORCHESTRAS 

Many musical groups were formed by the inmates 
over the life of the camp. Today the signs and guides 
tell us the only purpose of "the orchestra" was to keep 
the prisoners orderly when marching out to and hack 
from work. They don't want visitors to know the camp 
had a flourishing cultural life. In truth, the orchestras 
gave regular Sunday concerts and played on many other 
occasions. 



AUSCHWITZ. THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



The unidentified 
kite lien from the 
fnjnnthe two match- 
ing brick buildings are 
in front of the long 

building seen from the 
rear on the feeing 

page, forming a 
courtyard. 



19 



. i ■ 



Franc entrance to the 
Theater, which became 
.a home for Catholic 
Carmelite rtttftS be- 
tween I9S4 and |993 r 
They were forced to 
leave when American 
Jews p rotes ced the 
buildjrg's use by 
Cathoiics. 



. f 


1 


m 


Hk 


1 1 


■ ^1 






- 1- 'sJ 


JH 



Francsftek Piper was 

director-historian 

Ac die Auschwitz 

Memorial Museum 

-from I96S until 2G06. 




PHOrr^: iSHAPfiODK PAErS.COM 



pesticide, as reported by the Soviets in JfiMKEj 1945, 
I lmvever, rhat flies in die face of reports ot fanner in- 
mates who Lell of chc many activities lhai took place in 
the theater and thatZyklon B was stored in the Admin- 
is t rati cm BuiScfing, David Cole, holocaust researcher, 
wrote: "The last pictures taken inside this building 
showed pianos and costumes and | stage where the in- 
mates used to put on productions," 

Ditlieb Fdderer testified under rath at die 198K 
Ztindel trial that the theater was used by the inmates to 
put on plays and contained astageand musical instru- 
ment';. Fdderer decided to investigate the targe build- 
ingarteran Auschwitz cdui' guide told him the-building 
was unimportant and i*as only used by the Germans to 
p Lit junk into. He interviewed various museum officials 
and guards, during which time museum historians 
Franc iszek Piper and Daruira Czech confirmed to him 
that the budding was used as a theater during the war, 
i le showed a slide of a Ukrainian, choirsinging in what 






lie believed was the theater building, taken from the 
Dun'i'eld tile of the United States Archives. Most large 
German camps had concert hails where inmates organ- 
ized regular Saturday-night theater productions, operas 
and dances attended by thousands of fellow -inmates. 
Auschwitz was no diiferent. These conceits were the 
envy of villagers outside the camp, who did not have 
the instruments or halls tor such gatherings. At times 
villagers were invited and enjoyed the productions 
alongside camp inmates. They and workers and fami- 
lies from MonowiU. Birkenau and some sub-camps 
entered at the main door at the front or the building. 
Up to eight repeat performances a day were necessary 
to accommodate eveiy one. The only larger hall was in 
the Catholic Church in town, 2 km 5 (1.3 mi) north. 

THE SWIMMING POOL 

Continuing alongside the perimeter fence and 
turning left onto shady Birch Alley (Girken ha Her}, you 
come to the swimming pool. Interestingly, the pool for 
inmates- was not denied by museum staff until a lew 
years ago. although tourists who asked to see it were 
tokl by guides that it was "off limits," Located right in- 
side the fence, the pool measures 25 meters Jong, six. 
meters wide and three meters deep, 

According to Ditlieb Feldever, Museum Historian 
Piper told him that the pool had been used to rehabij- 
teste inmate patients and as recreation, Wartime aerial 
photographs taken by the Allies confirmed its exis- 
tence. Books written by former inmates refer to the 
Auschwitz pool; some say LheysneakecLmtotlie pool at 
night for a swim; othersthat it wasuscd for water polo. 
For example, Marc Klein, a French detainee, recalls the 
swimming pool in his booklet Observations ei rejffac- 



0^ 



These deyer and 
artistically designed 
playbills ara among 
several on display 
at the Mauthausen 
memorial site fa 
Austria, 




26 



AUSCHWITZ: THS UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



AUSCHWITZ; THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TO UK 



m 



The swimming pool in 

I 996. Birch Alley on 

the right, the perimeter 

fence or th& left. 



tons sur ks camps de concentration nazis: 

Auschwitz ! was made up <jf 28 blocks built of 
stone laid out in tees parallel rows between which 
ran paved streets. A third street ran the length of die 
Huadranrafe and wa= planted with birch trees: the 
fiirkenbalier intended as a walkway for the detainees, 
with benches; there also was an open-air swimming 
pool, (Rooklet pipages printed in Caen, 1948, p.to) 

He also wrote: 

. , - On Sundays and holidays . , , football, bas- 
ketball and water-pola matches (in an open-air pool 
built within the perimeter by detainees) attracted 
crowds. of onlookers. {De I'Universite ease camps de 
con cent ration: Te I rrLO tallages sirasbouFgwis, Parih, 
lei Belles-lettres, 5947, p. 453.) 

Inmates were sometimes also allowed to swim in 

the nearby Sola River, according to interviews with Je- 








hovah's Witnesses who had been interned in the tamp. 
Yet in 1009. when 1 asked at the information counter 
the location of the swimming pool, 1 was met with a 
blank stare. Alter persisting. 1 was finally answered 
with "Oh, do you mean the fife brigade reservoir?" 
The sign shown below, in Polish, English and Hebrew, 
was placed alongside the pool sometime after 2005. 

Birkettau also has a pool, which few have seen, but 
which now sports a similar sign. The water in the pool 
would hardly have been sufficient foi fire-fighting in a 
camp with 300 buildings' 



t kSm m, HiwfcfftfUKiitmmilHMfelVHiBta. 






,nra .taw flinas nim *a<iv itt s>b thm 
.19*9 n*> !w rmwtfi iraw flmii 



Auschwitz swimming, 
pool With starting 
bkic^i and entry 
JaCders.The diving 
board assd to be 
attached to the tall 
cc-rici-al block. 



3C 



AUSCHWITZtTHE underground guided tour 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



31 



FHftTO: 3CRAraO0itPAQES.COM 




TheSS Hospital, just 

o-jtslde the c imp. Note 

the double fence runs 

behind the -building. 

The crematorium and 

"gas chamber" are just 

across the street In 

front, not shown. The 

rounded object at 

lower center is the 

entrance to aons- 

per:oii air-raid shelter, 



THE HOSPITAL 

By continuing along Birch Alley and turning feftat 
Che fence perimeter, gpjjrig back toward trie main gate, 
yon come to the S-S Hospital which stands oji Lhe other 
side of the fence, ft had a surgical block as well as a ob- 
stetrical/gynecological block for inmate* (children 
were bom at Auschwitz), 

There were also quarantine areas in both camps for 
newly arriving prisoners, where they stayed for as long 
as six weeks to make sure they had no diseases that 
could be transferred to die rest of the camp population. 

Dr. LassdoTauber, now a wealthy Jewish landlord 
in Washington, D.C., was the chief surgeon at the in- 
mates' hospital at Auscbwite-Birkenau Birkenatt had 
several hospital buildings. One well -known inmate, 
Otto Frank, the father of Anne Frank, stayed there for 
three months in late 1944-eariy J945, with the com- 
plaint of suffering from exhaustion. While he remained 



32 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGHOUND GUIDED TOUR 



hospitalized, his two daughters were evacuated (follow- 
ing the rules or the Geneva Convention), along with 
many others, to Bergen -Be! sen concentration camp, 
away from the advancing Soviet army. Otto 'Frank was 
still cliere when the Soviets arrived. 

Another famous inmate, Elie Wiesel, writes chat he 
was in a hospital in -Auschwitz, recovering from sn op- 
eration on an infected foot and his father had been al- 
lowed to stay with him in the hospital. However, WieseJ 
chose to leave the hospital to go with the 60,000 others 
who marched west with the Gentians to another cam p. 
away from the impending Soviet "liberation." The 
guides at Auschwitz don't show the hospital. 



Below, a vW of the 
front of the S£ Hospi- 
tal across the street 
from the recorv 
=,iructed"ga5 ctiam- 
ber"-crematoriurn. 
Isn't it inconsistent to 
have a weapon of mass 
murder right next to 
the building where 
the Opposite Js taking. 
plice — saving Ikes 
through medical 

intervention! 




AUSCHWITZ:THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



33 



PHOTO- SCHAPeOOKIPWSS.COM 




Photo above shows 

the brick chimney 

that was built In 1947 

l& detached from the 

building. It has never 

been connected 

to the reconstructed 

crematory 

ovens inside. 

Right the two ovans 

in the earrent building 

wers built by the 

Soviets in I 947 

arid have never 

bean used. 



THE CREMATORIUM 

Directly across tin- outer 
road from the hospital is the 
reconstructed crematorium, 
known as the Gas Chamber, 
Note the tall chimney and 11 a i 
roof in the picture on the previ- 
ous page, The official story is 
that the small vents in the roof 
allowed Zyklon E pellets to be 
poured into thee ham Ixt below, 
thus "gassing" the victims 
lacked inside, 

However, air photas taken 
by U.S, reconnaissance planes in 
1944, not released until 1993, re- 
veal a peaked roof with two one- 
meter high chimneys over the 
two cremation furnaces, no vents or holes over the al- 
leged gas chamber, and 110 large chimney. 3t was then 
admitted that the Soviets changed the roof, cut the 





The Auschwitz "gas chamber" was really a morgue Until it was. slightly renovated into an 
air raid shelter by the Germans id Sept 1 944. Consider thai if the morgue was a gas cham- 
ber there was no morgue to store all those gissed bodies prior to cremation. The door- 
less opening at left, which leads to the room with only two cremation ovens, was cut 
through by the Russians in 1947. Before my tour grojp walked through, we were instructed 
to remain sj'ent"out o^ respe-ct;"' it was roped off and dark inside. Before I realized it. I WIS 
back outside again with no Opportunity CO ask questions. What a disappointment , . , and I 
wasn't tlte only one who felt that, 



holes and buik the chimney in 1947; in other words, 
the Museum went along with the lie until they were 
found om, and even afterward. 

For years the Museum staff used lake photos to 
pass the reconstructed gas chamber off as original, 
Only recently did they erect a sign outside of the cre- 
matorium showing the post-war elianges that were 
made to the building interior, 

We were informed by our guide thai the recon- 
struction is superficial and does not negate the build- 
ing's previous use as a gas chamber, and. in any ease, 
it's now reported there were relatively few gassings at 
Auschwitz— the great majority were done at Birkenau. 

The question, 'Is this holocaust revisionism?" was 
met with silence. It appears the Auschwitz "gas cham- 
ber" myth is too fragile to bear any scrutiny. 



34 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUI0E3 TOUR. 



AUS CHW ITZ: T H E UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 



35 



PHOTO: CWP0RTEA.COM 



'i wrrr 



-/»> 









Interior of garrrent 

workshop at 

AiJEt hwi tz wh ere 

women posffb^ 

ssw.ad niitaary 

uniforms. 



34 



THE WORKSHOPS 

From the crematorium you can sec the workshop 
buildings where inmates both learned and worked at 
trides, but they ate not on the guided tour. Himmler 
had ordered the construction of* workshops for handi- 
craft purposes; some were for woodworking; at least 
one was for sewing, 

Jean-Claude Pressac,an exterminationist hiscorian, 
claims that women deportees brought their sewing ma- 
chines along jfirith them, but thaL is ridiculous. The 
photographs of arrivi ng women show not one carrying 
a seeing midline on her back' Writers like Pressac and 
the museum officials don't want you to know Liiat the 
National Socialists pievided professional work equip- 
ment for the inmates and had clean., well-ran work 
areas, 



AU£CHWlTZ;TKt UNDERGROUND GUIDED TOUR 






RECREATIONAL SPORTS 

Inmates engaged in a variety of sports at both 
Auschwitz. and Birkenau, In addition to the swimming 
pools, a. large sports playing field was close ro the cre- 
matoriums at Birkenau, where soccer matches took 
place on Sundays, Ditlieb Fektereneportsthatoneof 
the first people to tell him that it was used as a spurts 
ground was one of the guards of the artifacts, a Mr. 
Urbaniek, At the loSSZiindel trial. Fold ere r showed a. 
slide of a map in one sf the main guidebooks of 
Auschwitz which indicated that the held had been a 
sports stadium, 

Tadeusx Borowski, a Polish Jewish prisoner at 
Birkenau wrote a book of short stories in which he 
mentioned the soccer held "on the broad clearing be- 
hind the hospital barracks' 1 (see diagram) and re- g 
membered when lie was ihe goalkeeper in a game 
on a beaut iftil. Sunday afternoon, He said a size- 
ahle crowd ofhospital orderlies and convalescent 
patients had gathered to watch the game. 

William Schicksaid in a 2006 interview with 
The Sun-Herald that he was placed in the Czech 
family camp at Birkenau where he played in soc- 
cer matches, and said the soccer field was located 
near Krema III. 

Boxing matches were also popular among the in- 
mates, Sals mo Arouch was a boxing champion in his 
home town of Salonika, Greece; after arriving at 
Auschwitz in 1943, he participated in twice -weekly box- 
ing matches. Fencing was popular - among some; at the 
Em si Zundel trial, Fe I derer showed a slide of inmates 
fencing, Unfortunate iy. we don't have access to any of 
these slides for this booklet, 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUIOED TOUR 



Beyond the ruins 

of Krema III is a forge 
grassy ar^a that was, 
once i.he Birkesiati 

soccer field. 




JM01K>!'«CH.4f506n(W3B,COP 



37 



BirMfen rou'aiis 

bin: ties — pic cured 
here a Birch cee 

grove at the west 
end of the tamp. 












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SprW!?* ^=1 






UN ,f ""Mfculii 







nnoToi;csAnEOQ'i!WiPCQM 



The Birkenau 
Concentration Camp 



BI RKENA.U is located three kilometers from 
Auschwitz J ojid main road, Building began in 194] for 
a camp to hold 200,000 persons, mainly non -workers 
and those waiting to be transferred elsewhere, thus 
there was a higher proportion of women, children, eld- 
erly and infi nn tha rt at Ausc hwi Ix 1 1 e vent ual ly covered 
425 acres and had 30;* buildings, A few prisoners 
worked in the warehouses, in die kitchensand in the 
crematoria, but most did not work. If 75% of the Jews 
were killed or arrival, who lived in all those barracks? 
No L n ly t ha L, b u r, the Ge rma n $ were build i ng i lew ba r ■ 
racks in the section the inmates called Mexico to house 
50,000 more prisoners. 

Today ill's a vast open space with only a Few isolated 
buildings scattered here and Lhere, Prior to the year 
2000, there were very few visitors to Birkenau. Tours 
d i d n 't go there ; even perso nal gui d es wan ! d n 't ri ke ya u 
there. Nov,' it's the lesser part of a full tour, featuring a 
look at a sample sleeping and lavatory barracks, which 
arein very poor condition, The original barracks a II had 
a porcelain-covered brick stove at one end from which 




a pipe ran along the center ofthe barracks inside a low 
brick structure, keeping rhe entire barracks warm in 
winter. Prisoners could sit on it, and some said they 
even cooked on it! Each brick barracks in the women's 
section hid its own lavatory. 

THE CENTRAL SAUNA 

This beautiful, modem hygiene building was built 
in 1943 and contained steam chambers and hot air 
ovens for disirtiec ting do tiling. New arrivals came here 
first, had their hair shorn, showered and were given 
clean clothing, However, it didn't have a single sauna. ]t 
did have a large main room that was sometimes used as 
a ballroom. 

Visitors to Birkenau are not shown this building, 
Lhe largest in the camp. 

Extra clothing and valuables the prisoners brought 
with them were stored in the 30 wooden warehouses 
across; the street From the sauna, which the Soviets 
burned down after they arrived. 

There are other, smaller disinfection buildings (#20 
on diagram on page 40) at Birkenau. but the guides 
wont take you there either. The doors are locked, and 
no signs identify che buildings. 



"The 5auna" was 
the name jiven to 
die hygiene biltlding . 
because of the 
s team and hoc air 
disinflation oven*. 
It's designed with 
two Identical 
sides — one for nan 
.ind one for women. 
Prisoners were 
brought here far 
showers. 

Below, one of the 
it&un chamber! in" 
the Central Sauna 
for debusing do-h- 
int- Moce the door 
at each end, 




IB 



AUSCH WIT2: THE U N t> E fl G R.O U N tj GUIDED TOUR 



AU1CHWITZ: THf UNDERGROUND GUIDED TO.U ft 



39 



DIAGRAM OF BIRKENAU CAMP 




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HI m 

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OS fiMfiitMliJS 




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40 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GUlOED TOUR 



KEY TO DIAGRAM OF BIRKENAU CAMP 



This ciagrin on tre fa-; nj page w^s crswn 
b/Joht 1 C.Bsll on the basis of air pnoTo; of four 
raeonna^san.ca dishes Irt 1 944, as we' I as investi- 
gation on che spot 

I . Fields plowed a.itf planted in 1 944. 

I. Access roads to the ruin carni. 

3, Cesspools drahng Ir.cg die 5o!a 1-3 km 
farther west. 

4.The '"White Hotist," where ten* of thou- 
sands of people are'uppoiad tcliave bean mur- 
dered «in Zyklon B. 

S.Tnis is where the victims are SLpposai tc 
have undressed, aJr>iaV|h ch^re wis no bu.ldlpg 
heretofore jme 1944. 

6,Tr*ss , 

Tha p holographs taken o' the ,tbove-men- 
tioned four pj.'ifleatior p ! -i^"J betmacn May ane 
September 1944 show na ditches, no pl.es of 
bodies arid no smoSe. a!ttaL£h it is dslmc-d that 
thrjus-ands of gushing victims WEre bEing thrcwn 
lino far^e (Pitches and burnt, every day. since the 
crtmato-ia were overloaded, 

8. Crornatiij'ia !V andV. 

9. 5mptv ditches, -tm long and I.Sm deep, 
w-dn water at riia bprtom. 

10. Centra! satnz- 

I I . Graiip of 3Q barracks. nick,nanr,ed Canada 
by initiates, where the passes sions o : new ar- 
rivals wera ic-ned and reutilfied, 

!2. Sound basins. and ditches far water pu- 
rification. A sewage purlfjcatiosi plait Wii also 
bSi-in sbora Ell!, so diat every ton;truc"JiH1 sec- 
tion possessed a ss^a^e punntauoin plane. All 
waste water flowed into these nstailations and 
the more or leu pt rifled water then f owed into 
die Wai thsd.Tie j* op cn.-air sewage piti'i* cation 
Installations mkiSt hav* re.ea££d rerrltjls odon, 



especially during the sumtr.&r. Many inmates re- 
ported an evr stench, wh-ch man;' d Mam at- 
tributed to ths crematoria;, while, ir realty, It 
ori^nated ether ^orn the pyrrficaciar plants or 
il"8 ootrtKliemica! plnnts nt Mpnowta. 

1 3. The two. large irtrraiiciria I 1 ani III were 
v.siblE to thoUHiid-s e-l pat!«r=-by Ir.side and out- 
ride me camp, over treeless fieidi and [rem the 
numaroLt barracki in th-E camlj Itsfilf, d\rty were 
o'ny surrounidedwith,;! barbed wire fence. 

4, Hire there was an orchestra made upoF 
Irtniates f;x>m Au^chwts and B'rlwriau.who' gsyt 
Sursiv eoneorts. 

1 5- Sports afd Foctbal: fie'd^. 

16. Inrr-ate hospital. 

1 7. Veg^tible gardens. 

IB. Camp eKpar.sior III was st»]l not iur- 
rotn ded by barbed wire (se ? !3C and 21 1 ) 

I?. Kirclwru (nma in the men's camp and 
four In il'-o woflnen's iamp) 

20. Eu Idhgs in which chtMng, btanksts-ind 
r^artrajsES ware dlilr.FtctDd. 

1 1 . GiJjrd towers. 

22.Three'meter-high ba-HSed wire ^nca. 

23. Camp WS3 for ppwro^; r,nd ve^Liblsi. 

24. Women 'j camp: bamcks of sto.ie and 
westf. 

25. Train p'acfarrrL 
;6Toi!Ets and wiihrooffl. 
27. Men's camp. 

23. Main entrance 

29. fUlwiy Licks. 

30. Water pumping siac'icKi, 

3 1 . Camp adiv.nistratiois'nslaied bui dings, 
32Ta B rkenau. 















AUSCHWITZ: ThE U |M D E R G HO U W D GUIDED TOUR 



•41 




One. of the eleven 

original kitchens at 

Birkenau that was Still 

standing tack in IW7. 



42 



THE KITCHENS 

The kitchens are also dosed ro the public, ostensi- 
bly for preservation and to preventYandalism. But why 
is that a concern for some buildings and not mbiUJ 
According ro Ditlieb Felderer, his slides show several 
extremely large cookingvats still inside the buildings. 

MUSIC & MATING 

A book written by a former inmate described haw 

thty put an shows with music and dancing and skits 
at Birkenau, Ruth Elias also mentioned the music 
shows in her book Triumph of Hope. The remarkable 
thing is that the SS guards sat in the audience side by 
side with the inmates, Cooperative interaction be- 
tween guards and prisoners was not unusual. Fur in- 
stance, they worked together sorting clothing at the 
"Canada" warehouses and even took the opportunity 
to have affairs. There were a tew marriages between 
guards and women prisoners at Blrkenau, although 
only after the war. Prisoners, however, were allowed 
Lo many each other. Some marriages took place and 
children were bom, 



AUSCHWITZ; THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TO J ft 



SPORT S; SOCCER. FIELD 

Inmates wanted to engage in sports on their days 
off, and the guards had tffl objection — in fact, it was 
an order from H irnmier to allow them sports because 
he thought it would increase bodily strength and 
help make them a better labor force, The inmates 
formed teams and enjoyed friendly compel irion on 
Saturday afternoons and Sundays, with enthusiastic 
cheering sections. Even the guards formed a team 
and played against the inmates! It Ls reported that 
reams sometimes used the crematorium grounds 
when there was no room on the main Held (fej on 
diagram on page 40). 

CREMATORIUMS 

There were four"Kremas' r at Dirkenau, of which 
you can see the ruins today. Kremas U and 111 are at the 
end of the road that runs horn the main entrance, 
while [V {a reconstruction) and Vareare nothing more 
than foundations, just north of the Central Sauna. If 
they were gas chambers, it means rhere were no 



Crematorium il In 
Birkcnasj as it ap- 
peared In Feb. I 943* 
still under construc- 
tion. The partially un- 
derground morgue, 
latdr caited th«"gas 
chamber," can be seen 
at right covered with a 
layer of snow. Ics- roof 
was six inches of con- 
crete, three feet 
aboveground , Con- 
side r that Zyklon B 
pellets need to tie 
heated to work. 




AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND GLIDED TOUR 



43 




Ruins of Crematorium 

II, photographed by the 

Soviets [n Feb. IMS, 

after diey Nad blown it 

up and blamed it or 

the Germans. In 200? 

it was roped off, with a 

large sign proclaiming 

it is undergoing 

nn expensive 

preservation process. 




+4 



morgues during the mo terrible typhus epidemics that 
sLruck the camp. Kremas fV and V had shower rooms 
and were close to the Sauna, which also had a shower 
room, The museum says these shower rooms were re- 
ally gas chambers, which means there was only one 
shower room, in the Sauna, for 90,1x50 prisoners! 

There is little doubt all the Kremas were destroyed 
by the Soviets shortly after their arrival, even though a 
book from the Auschwitz Museum says that Cremato- 
rium II and III were blown up by the Nazis on Jan. 20, 
iy-ig, Yet the officially accepted dare that the Germans 
abandoned the camp is January i.S-to days earlier. 
The Soviets found only a few dead bodies at the 
Birktmau camp, preserved by the freezing 
weather. Trie cremation owns had been disman- 
t led and taken horn the camp in November 1944. 
after removing the roofs. 

Left, ruins of Krer™ IV — even this Is a 
reconstruction! Allegedly, the Polish 
people Mfted off all the original bricks. 



AUSCHWITZ. THE UNDERGROUND GUIDED TO UK 



I f BERATION AS PROPAGANDA 

The photograph on this page is from (botage used 
in a Soviet propaganda film, shot by a Polish soldier- 
liberator, and shows the Birkenau clothing warehouses 
(known as "Canada") burning, In Lhe distance we see 
tall crematorium chimneys that had supposedly been 
blown up by the retreading Nazis one week before, (The 
story goes that the S5 abandoned the complex on Jan- 
uary iS, but sssrt a crew back on the 20th to blowup 
Crematorias 11,111 and V before the Rus- 
sians advanced on the camp, which 
turned out to be on jam 27.) 

This is the best evidence that the So- 
viet myth of the Nazis' desire to "ties troy 
the traces of their crimes" is ]us[ that— a 
myth, The SS had left behind a total of 
over 7000 survivors capable of telling 
their storj to Lhe enemy, so what would 
be the point of demolishing the crema- 
torium buildings? 

The highly publicized Soviet "libera- 
tion" of Auschwitz is a work of propaganda. The Red 
Army happened upon the camp, told the people found 
there they were free to leave, and continued on their 
way West. The prisoners were left to find their way 
home under appalling conditions, Soviet intelligence 
units then moved in and decided how best to use what 
they found to advance dieir own cause. 

The myth of the Auschwitz death camp was con- 
structed; and has undergone many discards since then. 
The number of four million "gassed" is probably the 
major casualty of historical revisionism — but (here are 
many others. 




Photo shows rhe 
clothing warehouses, 
at Blrkenau burning 
sometime after the ar- 
rival of the 5aviet5.or 
Jan. 27, with cremato- 
ria, chimneys still 
standing in the back' 
ground, The Germans 
are biamtsd for setting 
the fires 10 days ear- 
lier and destroying the 
cr*smatoriuriTs- 




AUSCH WITZ: THE UNDERGROUND C U I D E D . TO U | 



IS 



A.USCHWITZ-BIRKENAU MEMORIAL 

At the end of Lhe main road through Birkenau, just 
past the ruined crematoriums I [ arid III (where you see 
the number 13 on the diagram on page 40) is a large 
sculpture and many plaques, each in a different kn- 
gtNrga but with the same inscription; 



FOUH MJLLIQM 

PEOPLE SUFFERED 

AND Ol ED MERE 

■AT THE HAftDS 

OF THB NAZI 

MURDERERS 

BETWEEN THE YEAKS 

_*940 AND JP4S 



"For ever let mi s place be a cry of d es pair and a 
warning to humanity, where the Nazis mur- 
dered about one and a half mi LI ion men, 
iromen and children, mainly Jew?;, from 
various countries of Europe.' 7 
AUSCHWITZ-BIRKENALf 



The original plaqua. in 
place until I 990. 




f ' t'llROPt'. 



i-'pKJttHC/ 

A0 "■■■ is-i.s ■ 



The' present piaque 

makes- no mention of 

four mlHiDn victims. 



However, previous to 1990 and the collapse 
of the Soviet Union, this inscription claiming 4 
million deaths was on die plaques, and quite famous il 
was, The discrepancy between 4 million and 1,5 million 
didn't result in a change in the overall § million 
figure, nor has any adequate explanation been 
given [or the failure to reduce the latter figure. 
Such is the nature of rhe.Auschwitz-Birkenau 
experience. 

The last roll call, taken on January 17, 1945, 

showed a total of 16,32(1 prisoners in Auschwitz, 

[ — 10,030 men and 6,196 women. 1'he total 

count for all three camps was 67,012, according 

to Danuta Czech. 

Even with the publicity of the Nuremberg Trials, 

Auschwitz remained virtually unknown to the public 

for a decade arte;- the war, and really didn't become the 

phenomenon it is today until 1989 after the fall of the 




Soviet Union. According to Walter Staeglich in The 
Auschwitz Myth, German and Austrian soldiers who 
were interned at the camp as POW's by the Soviets 
after the war reported they .saw no traces of alleged 
mass murders anywhere in the camps. The Soviets did 
not permit outsiders to inspect ttiegTOunds, 

The 46 volumes of a Death Books" kept by the 
Auschwitz political department and confiscated by the 
Soviets were turned over to the International Commit- 
tee of the Red Cross in 1989. These records show 
around f>u,iw)t.i prisoners died between July 29, 1941 
and Dec 31, 1943 [2.5 years]. The tadier death books 
are missing, as are those far 1944. 

Based on these records, the international Red 
Cross has estimated that a total ofaronnd 135,000 [reg- 
istered! prisoners, Jews and non-Jews, died in the three 
Auschwitz, camps during its entire existence, These 
and other records are now available at the Interna- 
tional Tracing Service in Bad Arolson, Germany. 



Pope Benedict views 
a plaque with the new 
inscription, MomJrnent 
is in the center dis- 
tance. All I'BligilXIS 
and political leaders 
are expected tc pay 
homage at the "toly 
of hjsBe&t 



4* 



AUSCHWITZ: THE UNDERGROUND S U I & E D TOUR 



AUS.CHWlTZiTHE UNDERGROL'WD GUlDED TO'.U R 



i? 



Get more copies of this boo kief; 

Auschwitz: 

The Underground 
Guided Tour 



Auschwitz: 
The Underground 
Guided Tour 






"-r.TERtt_ 










-*** 


■jbfc>-_ ' 



You hold in your hands a remarkable 
study of Auschwitz llw is unlike anything 
ye i published. Thuugh it is purposely small 
in size and easy In read, it carries a powerful 
punch, The dttftei visited Auschwitz as a 
tourist armed with a broad study of the lil- 
era ture au rroun ding r he worl d- famous site , 
and from that visit has proceeded to decoiihtruct the Auschwitz shown tn bel- 
aud others as a "'death" m ''extermination" camp. By taking the reader 011 an 
"underground guided tour" around Auscliwit? -Birlwtuut, she dearly demon- 
strates it to be, atyafyingtimesand locations within the perimeters, a simple 
labor, concentration and transit camp for political prisoners, where the health 
of'the inmates was the prime concern of [hewmpauthdvities. Sound unbe- 
lievable? After reading this carefully researched book, you will see die horror 
stories for so long spread about Auscirwitz-Birkenau in a new light, and you 
may very well be so impressed you'll want to share your new- vision with til- 
ers. This cautiously witter) work moves toward 3 surprising conclusion that 
leaves tis pondering how so mueh that is not true has seeped into our con- 
sciousness as "fact-" 

Aumh'witz; The Linda-ground Guided Tour (sollxrover, 48 pages, #535, 
sio) is available from TESR, P.O. Box 15877, Washington, D.C. 20003. ^1 ^ 
free at 1-877-773-9077 to charge copies to Visa or MC, No S&H inside U.S. 
BULK DISCOUNTS: 1-5 copies are Sio each; 6-49 copies are £7 each; 50-99 
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